Google+ Undergoes Graphic Redesign

Google+ SEO

Google+ is on the move again. It hasn’t been that long since their last update, but apparently they’ve decided to follow the early Facebook method of switching up the look every few months or so. The only difference is that Google+ doesn’t have a community of people making a fuss about it, mostly because they don’t really have a community of people that use it to begin with. Still, it’s growing in popularity and it’s become a must-have for local businesses, so let us here at Wikimotive tell you how the redesign will effect your social media and SEO.

The redesign is very, very photo heavy. Remember those giant cover images that many people said were a little too big? Well, those have been changed. Now they’re even bigger. Pretty much the entirety of a page above the fold is now taken up by your banner image. It’s not great, but you don’t HAVE to utilize all the space, it just can look a bit off if you don’t.

They have also added a couple features to touch up your own photos after uploading them. The first is called “auto enhance,” and it’s pretty straight forward. It takes your photo and automatically tweaks things like brightness, saturation and focus. You can give it a try on their demo page here.

The other feature they’ve added is much more interesting. It’s called “auto awesome.”  I don’t know if I’d call it awesome, but it is a fun (if gimmicky) little tool. Here’s how Google describes it:

Sometimes we’ll create a brand new image based on a set of photos in your library. For example: if you upload a sequence of photos, we’ll try and animate them automatically. Or if you send us a few family portraits, we’ll find everyone’s best smile, and stitch them together into a single shot. Likewise with panoramas, filmstrips, and a whole lot more. We call these kinds of enhancements Auto Awesome.

Will these features be able to boost Google+ out of it’s relative obscurity? Probably not, but they do mean that Google isn’t even close to giving up the fight. They continue to prove that Google+ is here for the long haul.

Whether we like it or not.

 

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